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Posts Tagged ‘moleskine sketchbook’

Are you interested in participating in a collaborative Sketchbook Project? Check out this post by Mari over at CreateWriteNow.com for details of an exciting opportunity for creative journalers.

Attention all creative journalers! Your art journals, travelogues, memoirs, to-do lists, short stories and other masterpieces are wanted to join a traveling exhibit with the Brooklyn Art Library.

The Sketchbook Project , created by Brooklyn-based company Art House, is a global collaborative art project that encourages anyone – writers, artists, accountants, mechanics, chefs, children, you! – to take a blank sketchbook, fill it with personal thoughts, designs and emotions, then return it by January 15 to be included in a traveling exhibition and permanent collection. Talk about journaling on a global scale!

Here are the basic rules:

  1. Anyone, anywhere in the world can participate (“This project is for anyone who craves an outlet for that undeniable creative bug.”). Thousands of people participate each year, and every sketchbook is a unique piece of art.
  2. It costs $25 to join the Sketchbook Project (and $30 more to digitize your book and make it available to anyone around the world – books receive half a million viewers each year), which includes a custom-designed 5×7, 32-page sketchbook made in Portland, Oregon.
  3. To participate in the 2013 exhibition, you need to send your completed sketchbook back by January 15, 2013. It will then go on tour, hitting cities across North America, including San Francisco, Austin, Toronto, Chicago and Atlanta. Your book will keep in touch from the road, sending you an email or text message updating you on its journey.
  4. Your sketchbook will then take up residence in the Brooklyn Art Library’s permanent collection and play an important part in journaling history.

Interested in participating in the Sketchbook Project this year or in the future? What kind of journal would you create? Share your thoughts in the comments, and read more about the project

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I love what Jorge did with his Moleskine Sketchbook.

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I wanted to use an ink wash for the next installment in the Frosti notebook. I’ve been short on time, so I did a quick sketch of Frosti’s profile. The outlines were done with a Tombow Ultra Roll Pen, the background I used Higgins ink. It performed much like watercolor paint, and I had to be careful not to get the paper too wet or the paper started to bubble. The smooth, coated surface on the paper did resist the watered down ink at first, and there were little specks that did not accept the paint, but this is to be expected with Moleskine’s Japanese Album and Sketchbooks. I think I would prefer the Moleskine Watercolor journal for ink wash in the future.

I used pen & ink and ink wash in the Moleskine Japanese Album. I think the Watercolor Journal would have yielded better results, but this works in a pinch.

I used pen & ink and ink wash in the Moleskine Japanese Album. I think the Watercolor Journal would have yielded better results, but this works in a pinch.

I wanted to spend more time on this, but my schedule wouldn’t permit it, so I feel as though this illustration looks rushed. I am not thrilled with it, but like so many things in life, I had to let go of it and look forward to the next one.

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Illustration created in my Moleskine Sketchbook with Staedtlers Triplus Fineliner Pens

I found Staedtler’s Triplus Fineliners while I was browsing my local big-box office supply store. I was initially attracted by the well-designed packaging and selection of colors, but was intrigued by the claim of  effortless writing. I brought the pack home with me for a test run in a Moleskine Sketchbook.

The Basics

After opening the package, I discovered 20 pens, triangular-shaped and very light in weight. The points measures a tiny 0.3 mm, great for fine detail. The silver-gray pens are attractive with a colored cap that snaps on to the back of the pen. According to the packaging, these pens can be left uncapped for hours without drying out. I didn’t get to test this theory, but I can confirm that the pens remained wet after I completed this illustration. The plastic case looks modern, is protective and can be tilted up, giving you easy access to the pens when working. So far, so good.

There are 20 Triplus Fineliners packaged in a case that doubles as a pen stand.

There are 20 Triplus Fineliners packaged in a case that doubles as a pen stand.

Inspired by the fine point of the pens, I decided to create an image of a rope. Thousands of tiny threads would be a good test for the fine point and would give me an idea of the durability of the tip. Since I tend to illustrate with a heavy hand, I smash tips pretty quickly and am always looking for pens that can handle pressure.

The fine point of the Triplus Fineliners were perfect for thousands of lines in theis know illustration.

The fine point of the Triplus Fineliners were perfect for drawing thousands of lines in this illustration. The points remained firm even after hours of use.

The pens were good performers, producing crisp, bright lines and the tips were firm, but not hard. The ink dried quickly and there was no problem with bleed through in the heavy pages of my Moleskine Sketchbook. I did also test these in my Moleskine planner to see how they would perform with thinner paper. I am pleased to say that the pens did not bleed through, But because of the translucency of the paper, you could see a muted version of the line on the backside of the page which is pretty typical for a Moleskine. Blending was easy and the colors were compatible with each other. I was most impressed with the durability of the tip. After drawing thousands of lines, none of the tips were crushed and the pens still drew wet lines without drying out.

Each point measures 0.3 mm and is perfect for fine line sketching.

Each point measures 0.3 mm and is perfect for fine line sketching.

It was quite easy to sketch with these in the beginning, but as time wore on, the corner of the triangular shape started to dig into my finger. It may not be a problem for most of you, but this did bother me. This is a minor complaint when compared with the benefits.

The triangluar shape was comfortable for me at first, but after extended use, a corner started to dig into my finger. This may not be a problem for most people, but it was for me.

The triangluar shape was comfortable for me at first, but after extended use, a corner started to dig into my finger. This may not be a problem for you, but it was for me.

The Pros:

  • 20, 0.3 mm fine point tips for detailed sketches
  • No bleed through, even on the thin paper in a Moleskine planner.
  • Quick drying on the page
  • Tips won’t dry out after leaving the caps off for hours
  • Great color selection
  • Case angles up for ease of use
  • Durable tips won’t crush under pressure
  • Triangular shape, ergonomic design

The Cons:

  • Triangular shape may be uncomfortable for some
  • Line can be seen through backside of thin paper, although there is no bleed through.

Overall, I was impressed with this set of pens and would use them for any detailed work I might have in the future. I would not recommend them for large areas of color, however because of the fine point.

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Markers and a Pigment Liner Were Used in the Moleskine Sketchbook.
Markers and a Pigment Liner Were Used in the Moleskine Sketchbook.

Finally, I am done with “Z”. The bright colors are indicative of how good I felt about finishing this one. Most of the textures were inspired by everyday things but a couple were inspired by poetry.

I was able to use the markers without causing the paper to buckle or disintegrate by using multiple, light layers and allowing each layer to dry before adding the next. The black pigment liner was used to outline things after I was finished with the color. The crisp black line does a great job of hiding the imperfections and making the color pop.

My approach on this letter was more illustrative and less literal than some of the letters in this series. I like the playful, quilted-look and I am planning on doing more of these in the future.

q
By using the pigment liner when I was finished with the colored areas, I was able to cover small imperfections and make the images look crisp.

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My Angry Mood Literally Exploded on the Page, Leaving the Y Exhausted and on Its Side.

My Angry Mood Literally Exploded on the Page, Leaving "Y" Exhausted and on Its Side.

I was angry when I created “Y”. Something had me fuming and the result was an explosion in my Moleskine sketchbook. I experienced a strong burst of energy and  an urge to work fast. I had no patience for details such as using the correct brush or waiting for paint to dry. I dove right in, grabbing whatever I could and attacked the journal with a vengeance. I used my fingers mostly, and the back sides of pencils to carve spirals and the word “why” into the gel medium that was laid down as my base layer.

The act of tossing paint at the pages seemed to help release my anger and I was beginning to feel relieved. As I worked, the image started to move downward and to the right as if it were declining. My plan was to place an illustration of the letter “Y” onto the page, but when I looked at the image, I realized the letter was already there, exhausted and lying on its side.

I have never created art from anger before, so this was a real surprise. Next time I feel angry, I’ll be sure to open up a sketchbook and let ‘er rip. It was fun.

The Spirals Were Created by Slathering a Layer of Golden Gel Medium as the Base Layer and Drawing Spirals inthe Gel Using the End of a Pencil. The Colors Added On Top Collected In the Crevices of the Gel Medium and Accentuate the Underlying Texture.
The Spirals Were Created by Slathering a Layer of Golden Gel Medium as the Base Layer and Drawing Spirals in the Gel Using the End of a Pencil. The Colors Added On Top Collected In the Crevices of the Gel Medium, Accentuating the Underlying Texture.

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The Letter X Has Gotten a Bad Wrap. It is a Beautiful Letter, Undeserving of its Negative Reputation.

Letter X Has Gotten a Bad Wrap. It is a Beautiful Letter, Undeserving of its Negative Reputation.

I think that “X”is the most abused letter in the alphabet. It always seems to show up in all of the wrong places. It is used to symbolize delete, cancel, or obliterate and is frequently used to denote that you are incorrect. It is also used to sound mysterious, dark and forbidden in terms like X-rated, X-files and X marks the spot. When you think of “X”, what do you think about?

I think that an “X” is beautiful. It is perfectly balanced, strong and has smooth flowing curves that flare out to form sensuous serifs. Its form is clear and “X” would never be mistaken for any other letter. It is hard to believe that something that looks this good could be so bad.

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This past weekend, as I looked through my back window, I realized the trees overlapped to form the letter “W”, so this is how I chose my subject for this letter. I went back to using the Tombow Drawing Pencils because I love how they work with this paper.

This day was sunny and beautiful and I found myself becoming entranced with the patterns on the bark of the trees. I hadn’t realized how geometric the bark was until I really took a look at it. The tree of the left had patterns that reminded me of a flowing river and I was struck with how patterns seem to repeat themselves in nature.

The Letter W Presented Itself Within the Branches of the Trees In My Backyard. The Patterns of the Bark are Similar to Other Patterns in Nature.

The Letter "W" Presented Itself Within the Branches of the Trees In My Backyard. The Patterns of the Bark are Similar to Other Patterns in Nature.

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I was inspired by the space within the letter “U”, so my illustration has this as its focal point. The charcoal I used provided a intense black contrast to the paper and was easy to smudge. The pattern of the paper’s texture is evident in the smudged areas, but I like the effect.

Charcoal Works Well on the Moleskine Sketchbook Paper and the Blends Take on the Pattern of Papers Texture.

Charcoal Works Well on the Moleskine Sketchbook Paper and the Blends Take on the Pattern of Paper's Texture.

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While technically this illustration was not created within the pages of the Moleskine Sketchbook, it was pasted in using a gel medium. This method can be used for creating collage-type images for your journaling projects in which you want to create a soft effect with a texture that is similar to an acrylic painting. It is also a great method to use on cards or for making art to hand on your walls.

This collage was created in Photoshop using photos from a vacation I took to Jekyll Island. To add softness and wear to the illustration that is reminiscent of the sea shore, I added the pastel filter to give the image an illustrated look. You don’t need to filter your photos for this method to work well, I chose to do this as an artistic choice. The collage was printed on a color laser printer to which I applied a thick layer of Golden gel medium over the image area. The gel medium was allowed to dry overnight. Once dry, I ran the image under water to remove the paper from the gel medium by gently rubbing the paper until it was completely removed and set it aside and allowed it to dry.  The color from the laser printer remained embedded in the gel medium. From there, it was a simple matter of applying more of the gel medium to the paper in the sketchbook and pressing the gelled image into the medium and allowing to dry.The gel medium I used was a soft gel with a matte finish. For sharper images, you can use a gel with a glossy finish.

This image has 2 letter T’s, one which was completely accidental. I added a green T on the right page intentionally, but the T that appeared in the center of the collage was a happy accident. Once I realized the surprise T was there, I opted to add a T that was sans serif to repeat the one created in the illustration.

A Gel Meduim Was Used to Capture and Paste the Collage Into My Moleskine Sketchbook.

A Gel Medium Was Used to Capture and Paste the Collage Into My Moleskine Sketchbook.

The Gel Medium Provides a Textured Surface Similar to that of an Acrylic Painting. It also Gives a Softened Look to the Images.

The Gel Medium Provides a Textured Surface Similar to that of an Acrylic Painting. It also Gives a Softened Look to the Images that was Reminiscent of the Sea Shore.

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