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Archive for the ‘Journal Reviews’ Category

I just received photos of Moleskine’s Limited-Edition PacMan Notebooks and I though you might want to take a closer look. Originally these were scheduled to be released in September, but the publication date has been pushed back to November 2010 and is subject to change.

Thirty years ago, Namco, a Japanese gaming house created not just a new, popular video game, but a cultural icon that would define the eighties; now, Moleskine’s limited-edition PacMan notebooks commemorate the hungriest video-game hero of all time. The five-piece assortment includes pocket and large-sized books, as well as a colorful Volant set in commemorative packaging.

The pocket notebooks are embossed with playful, pixilated imagery that includes PacMan, ghost characters, and fruit imagery. The larger notebooks are embossed with a glossy/matte replica of the game screen. Each notebook includes a ghost printed inside the cover and decorative sticker inserts. Back covers of each notebook feature traditional video game lines such as “Game Over”, “Insert Coin”, and “High Score.” The communication band is uniform for all of the notebooks: it shows the vast array of characters and the official Pac-Man logo with 30th anniversary information. The special-edition Volant pack includes four different colored books with an embossed silver character on each notebook.

The pocket notebooks are embossed with playful, pixilated imagery that includes PacMan, ghost characters, and fruit imagery.

The communication band is uniform for all of the notebooks: it shows the vast array of characters and the official PacMan logo with 30th anniversary information.

Vivid designs in black and yellow commemorating one of the most well-known pop-culture icons of the 20th century: PacMan.

Custom pages in the interior of the notebooks.

The special-edition Volant pack includes four different colored books with an embossed silver character on each notebook.

Volant Gift Set and Limited Edition Notebooks

Both look awesome, how do you decide which one you want?

Thirty years ago, Namco, a Japanese gaming house created not just a new, popular video game, but a cultural icon that would define the eighties; now, Moleskine’s limited-edition Pac-Man notebooks commemorate the hungriest video-game hero of all time. The five-piece assortment includes pocket and large sized books, as well as a colorful Volant set in commemorative packaging.The pocket notebooks are embossed with playful, pixilated imagery that includes Pac-man, ghost characters, and fruit imagery. The larger notebooks are embossed with a glossy/matte replica of the game screen. Each notebook includes a ghost printed inside the cover and decorative sticker inserts. Back covers of each notebook feature traditional video game lines such as “Game Over”, “Insert Coin”, and “High Score.” The communication band is uniform for all of the notebooks: it shows the vast array of characters and the official Pac-Man logo with 30th anniversary information. The special-edition Volant pack includes four different colored books with an embossed silver character on each notebook.

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Carnival of Pen, Pencil and Paper

There are a lot of great articles to browse through in this month’s carnival. I hope you enjoy them all.

Art Journaling

Behind the Pages: A Rough Draft
Discover the process of art journaling at WildThyme.

Decorated Art Journal Cover
Visit the Whatever blog to see an example of a decorative cover inspired by moss.

Journal Page Frame
Learn how to create a frame for a page in your art journal at Quinn Creative.

Art Journaling: What’s It All About
What is the background of art journaling and where can you go for help on your art journaling journey? Find out at CraftCritique.

Notebooks & Journals

Environmentally Writing Tools
Looking for notebooks, pens, notepads, wrapping paper and other eco-friendly stationery? Look no further than Writersbloc for the answers.

The Perfect Little Black Notebook: My Custom Design that Ended the Quest
Is it worth creating your own notebook? Find out at Pocket Blonde.

Rhodia Webnotebook Version 3: Even Better than Before!
Discover what makes the new Webbie the best Webbie yet at For Love and Idleness.

Jottrr – a New Budget Competitor to Moleskine
Check out this notebook at lady dandelion.

Pencils

Derwent Sketching Pencils – HB,2B,4B, and Dark Wash 8B
Learn more about Derwent pencils manufacturing process and find out what kind of writers they are at Pens’n’Paper

Pens

How to Find Pens with Flexible Nibs
Learn More at Leigh Reyes, My Life as a Verb.

Featured Pen – Visconti Rembrandt – followup
Video Demonstration of a Rollerball pen that fills and flushes like a fountain pen at Whatever.

Lamy 1.1 mm Italic – Quality for a Few Bucks
A great little nib without the hefty price is reviewed by lady dandelion.

Retro 51 Harley Davidson Flathead Pen Review
Git yer motor runnin’ with this exciting pen at Goldspot Pens.

Winston Churchill and his Pens. From the Archives
A glimpse into Churchill’s history of pen use at Palimpsest.

Uni-ball Jetstream Color Ballpoint Pen Review
A smooth writer that looks great too. See the details at WritersBloc.

DIY Fountain Pen Ink Tracker
Create a pen and ink journal so you’ll always know which pen is inked with which of your oodles of ink at Miscellaneous Ramblings of a Thirty-Something DIYer.

Sakura Stardust Gelly Roll Magic
Five reasons why the Sakura Stardust Gelly Roll might make you swoon at Journaling Saves.

Pilot Petit1 Review
A cheap, mini fountain pen that packs a punch at RateMeister.

Inks

Diamine Raw Sienna Ink
Diamine Raw Sienna Ink – A replacement for discontinued Sailor Brown? Find out at Inkophile.

Pelikan Edelstein Mandarin Ink
See this clear true orange with just the slightest tinge of yellow at Pocketblonde.

Ink Review: Diamine Oxblood
Ever feel like writing with blood? Check out this bloody ink at Seize the Dave.

A big thank you to everyone who submitted a blog post for this month’s carnival of pen, pencil, and paper, and please continue to keep on submitting entries going forward.  Next month, The Pen Addict will be hosting the Carnival, so submit your posts here, and many thanks to Nifty from Notebook Stories for getting this all set up!

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Contact Keeper

Contact Keeper comes in three sizes, pocket, medium and large. Please note that while the stitching on the Keepers appears red in the photos, it is black. For some reason my camera saw the stitching as red.

For those of you who take notes, have a lot of business contacts and use a daily planner, you might want to take a look at Contact Keeper notebooks for an all-in-one solution. Three sizes of notebooks offer a unique storage/notes combination to keep your contact information for future reference.

These three review copies were given to me by the nice folks at Contact Keeper to review here. I will be giving them away at the end of the work week to three lucky readers. Just leave your comment at the bottom of this post no later than 8:00 PM EST on Friday, September 10th. I will choose a winner using True Random Number Generator at random.org, with the first to reply being number one, and so on. I will contact the winner via email. If you win, you have until Friday, September 17th to claim your prize or I will choose another winner.

Contact Keeper

What’s Included

While the sizes are different, they each have common features. Each is made from what appears to be a vinyl PU or another man-made material that is smooth to touch and feels similar to fine leather, especially the largest notebook. The edges and corners are all stitched with black thread even though it appears red in the photos. There is an elastic strap on each model to keep the notebook closed.

The medium and large Keepers include ring binders on the inside for easy addition and removal of pages.

Medium and Large Keepers

The large and medium-sized models include ring binders along with 30 contact pages, each with a single business card slot. There are also three additional pages with multiple slots per page for contacts that don’t require an entire page of notes. This gives you a total of 42 contacts in the large notebook and 39 in the medium notebook. If you need more pages, you can order additional refill kits online at ContactKeeper.com. There is also a Receipt Envelope, a Business Activity envelope and 15 leaves of ruled pages for additional note taking.

A Receipt Envelope and a Daily Planner are found in both the medium and large Keepers.

A four-year calendar and a four-page day planner are included in the large and medium-sized models, but if you intend you use it as a planner, you will need to order more planner inserts. I can’t tell from the site if you can order these individually or if they only come as part of a set, so you will need to contact the folks at Contact Keeper if you want additional planning pages.

Full page layout includes a slot for your business card and plenty of lines for notes on both front and back of the page. additional pages in the back have multiple slots per page with reduced room for note taking.

Large pockets on both front and back covers of the Keepers offer a convenient space to slide papers along with small clear pockets to slide one of your own business cards. If you need to keep a pen, there is a narrow pen slide on the inside front cover. The large Keeper has one unique feature; a large clip on the inside of the back covers that acts as a built-in clipboard.

The medium and large Keepers have a clear pocket for storing your business card that provide easy identification. A clear pocket on the spine can be used to label your notebook in case you use several for different purposes. Large pockets on both front and back covers store papers, notes, photos and other items.

Daily Planning Pages

A four-year calendar and daily planning pages for scheduling. With only four pages for planning you will need to order more planning pages if you intend to use this as a planner. As-is, it may be useful for occasional seminars or workshops.

All of the Keepers, including the small one, have an elastic strap to keep the contents compact, however the pen slide is only available in the medium and large Keepers. The pen slide is narrow, so if you have a high-end pen or mechanical pencil that has a larger diameter than the typical office pen, it may not fit. My Tombow Ultra did not fit.

Small Keeper

The small Contact Keeper is more like a business card wallet than a notebook. It is sized to fit into your back pocket or purse. With only 2 pockets, an elastic strap and a set of business card-sized sticky notes, it is the smallest and least complicated of the bunch. There is one pocket for your business cards and one for the cards you collect. Notes about your contact are written on the sticky note, and can be applied to your contact’s card for later review.

Note for Artists and Other Creative Folks:

While these are made specifically for business cards and contacts, I can’t help but imagine using them to catalog notes about paint formulas or artistic processes. You could cut business card-sized pieces of your artistic experiments, slide them into the business card slots and keep notes about the process used to achieve the effect or paint color on the card. This would be a great way to keep all of your creative information in one place, handy for future reference.

Remember to leave a reply if you would like to win one of the Contact Keepers. The giveaway is open to everyone around the world and ends Friday night, September 10th at 8:00 PM EST. I will contact the winner via email. If you win, you have until Friday, September 17th to claim your prize or I will choose another winner.

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Head on over to the Whatever blog to read the review and to enter the Webbie 3.0 giveaway.

Head on over to the Whatever blog to read the review and to enter the Webbie 3.0 giveaway.

Anticipating the new Rhodia Webbie 3.0 notebook? If so, head on over to the Whatever blog and read Julie’s review of the new Rhodia Webbie 3.0. While you are there, be sure to leave a comment by Saturday, August 28th for a chance to win one. The givewaway is open to everyone worldwide and you could be the winner!

I have these on order but still have a few of the previous version at clearance prices at journalingarts.com. Prices good while supplies last.

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Find out how Leuchtturm Journals compare to Moleskine and Rhodia Webnotebooks when using fountian pen and ink.

A thorough and informative review of Leuchtturm journals at Lady Dandelion’s blog answers the question about notebook paper and fountain pen compatibility. Armed with Leuchtturm, Moleskin and Rhodia notebooks along with fountain pen and ink, she shares the results of writing in each journal. For those of you who love writing in journals with fountain pens, find out how Leuchtturm compare to the notebooks you are using now.

“As most people who like to write and are conscious about which pens they write with – I’m on a perpetual hunt for a real good notebook. I find it harder to find a good notebook with fountain pen friendly paper than to find a reasonably priced fountain pen with a pleasant nib or a beautiful ink. . .

Let us know what you are using and what combination works best for you by leaving a comment including your pen, ink and notebook preference.

Photo and excerpt published with permission of Lady Dandelion.

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I thought it would be appropriate to create a pencil sketch in Ecosystem’s Sketchbook since this is what it is designed for. According to the folks at Ecosystem, this journal is named the Artist and it shares the same great features as their planners and journals. It is made from 100% post consumer recycled paper and is entirely made in America.

Pencil sketching was predictable on the paper. I was able to create crisp lines and smooth shading.

The paper is bright white, fairly smooth and has just a little bit of tooth. The slight texture is visible in areas where the shading was the darkest, but this is typical with most papers and it adds a bit of softness to the illustration. I was able to create crisp lines and smooth blends without any issues. Overall, it is quite nice to sketch on although it would be nicer if the paper were a little bit thicker.

This is another image from an Affirmation Journal I started to aid in creativity. More will follow soon.

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Affirmation Journal spread created with acrylic paint and pen and ink.

Affirmation Journal spread created with acrylic paint and pen and ink.

I have been using a variety of mediums in an affirmation journal I am in the process of creating. This spread was created using acrylic paint. The abstract design was inspired by the hand design on the cover that I previously blogged about. To get a better idea of the flow of this journal, please see my earlier reviews Illustrating the Cover of an Ecosystem Large Sketchbook and Color Laser Transfer in an Ecosystem Sketchbook.

The watercolor paint and parts of the laser transfer from the previous page had bled through the paper a bit leaving me with a hand shape and backwards letter on this two page spread. This inspired me to continue the theme and to create an abstract flower.

The laser transfer from the previous page bled through a bit, which inspired me to create an abstract hand image for this spread.

To start, I outlined the hand shape on the left page and applied paint within the pencil lines. The remaining color and design was added on top using a brush.

To start, I added paint on top of the had image that showed through the page.

Ecosystem Sketchbook

I painted only on the left page, so I could press the pages together and create a mirror image.

When I had finished painting the left page, I closed the journal and pressed the painting onto the right page, creating a mirror image.

I pressed the pages together by closing the journal. When I opened it again, I had a good background for my image.

The paper buckled quite a bit during the painting process, but flattened out somewhat when the paint dried. There was a little bit of show through on the backside, but nothing major. Overall, I wouldn’t recommend using acrylic paints with the Ecosystem Sketchbook. The paper ends up very wavy and the pages were weakened where it is perforated. Perhaps in the future I will try again using a primer of some sort.

Once the initial layer was dry, I repeated the process using additional pinks, golds and yellows.

I used pen and ink to create the text. The ink was very compatible with the paper in the Ecosystem Sketchbook. There was no feathering, show through or bleed through and the lines were crisp and black against the bright white paper.

The final illustration including text.

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Daycraft’s Vogue 2010 Planners feature striking, modern designs that are uncommon in the day planner market.  These diaries pack efficient planning layouts, useful accessories and beautiful materials wrapped in a thoughtful, beautiful design both inside and out. The Vogue planners are available in four sizes and two formats, and three different cover designs.

Daily Planner

Daycraft Vogue Planners

Daycraft's Vogue Planners are available in both daily and weekly planning formats in several sizes.

Daycraft’s Vogue 2010 Planners feature striking, modern designs that are uncommon in the day planner market.  These diaries pack efficient planning layouts, useful accessories and beautiful materials wrapped in a thoughtful, beautiful design both inside and out. The Vogue planners are available in four sizes and two formats, and three different cover designs.

Daily Planner

The page-a-day or daily planner I reviewed has 408 pages. It has a flexible, brown, suede-like cover imprinted with an abstract floral that wraps around both front and back covers. A vertical ribbon embellished with a plastic repeat of the floral design adorns the front. At first glance, it appears as though this is an elastic strap, but it is not, although you could slide a piece of paper or notes underneath. While I love the design of the planner, I am not a fan of the plastic charm and I think it would get caught on things over time. Fortunately, it can be easily removed. The daily planning format includes hourly lines for 8:00 am through 10:00 pm in addition to three lines for notes at the bottom of each page.  A small monthly calendar is in the bottom, right corner of each two-page spread.

Daycraft Daily Planner

One-page-per-day planning format has hourly lines from 8:00 through 10:00 pm. Each month is distinguished by a color bar at the top.

Daycraft Daily planner

A monthly overview and lines for notes are at the beginning of each month.

Dayraft Daily Planner

A forward, monthly planning calendars in the back of the planner allow for future long-term planning.

Weekly Planner

The smaller, pink diary has 232 pages and includes a weekly planning format. The cover is flexible and has a spongy feel similar to the cover on the Rhodia Webnotebook. An abstract, circle design has been embossed on the front and back covers. This planner also features a vertical ribbon embellished with a plastic charm. Each two-page planning spread displays one week with Monday through Wednesday on the left and Thursday through Sunday on the right.

Daycraft Weekly Planner

A colorful ribbon and plastic charm decorate the cover of the planner. The ribbon is not elastic and it is only on the front of the cover. Its primary purpose appears to be decorative.

Daycraft Weekly Planner

The planning format is one-week-per-page.

Daycraft Weekly planner.

Each month is preceded by a different color and design and a monthly planning calendar.

Daycraft Weekly Planner

Each month is distinguished by a different color and design.

Daycraft Weekly Planner

The Daycraft Weekly Planner includes beautiful graphics which are perforated for use as notes or labels.

Daycraft Weekly Planner

An address book in the back of the planner is great for storing contacts.

Features

Both planners feature colorful designs throughout the planners with each month having a different color and design that is displayed at the top of each page. Each month starts with a full-page of colorful design, a monthly calendar, lines for notes and a quote. A color-coordinated ribbon bookmark helps you keep you on track.

Small monthly and yearly planning calendars and tons of informational pages are included in the planner. You’ll find information on public holidays, world time zones,  IDD codes, conversion tables, pages for notes and a large address books. Information on Hong Kong banks, airlines, hotels, telephone numbers and rail systems are included, too.

I am unsure if the paper is acid-free or not. The color is fairly bright, but the paper is thin and somewhat translucent. It is on par with the paper in Moleskine’s planners and not suitable for wet pens or markers. It should be fine for those who use ballpoint pens , but anything else has showthrough and a substantial amount of bleedthrough.

Final thoughts

Daycraft’s Vogue planners are beautifully designed, efficient and packed with lots of useful information. The design stands out from the plethora of simple, black planners and would be a good choice for those who crave something unique. The materials appear to be top quality with exception of the paper, which is a bit thin and translucent for my taste. If you are using ballpoint pen or pencil, though, you will be more than satisfied with this planner.

Unfortunately, these planners are not available in the US at this time, so if you want one, you will have to find one from an overseas supplier.

These planners were supplied to me as review samples by Hong Kong-based Daycraft who produces a large line of beautiful diaries, notebooks, sketchbooks and corporate planners. Their products are designed in Hong Kong and manufactured in Dongguan, China by the Tai Shing Diary Ltd.

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Finshed page in my affirmation journal.

The first page in my affirmation journal created with a laser printer transfer, marker and watercolor.

I have been wanting to experiment with transferring a laser printer image into a journal using solvents for a while. Since the weather is warmer, and I am able to work outside, I decided to start my newest journal creation, an affirmation journal, using this technique. The Ecosystem sketchbook paper seemed appropriate for this method with its bright white paper. Even though it is not as thick as the paper in a Moleskine sketchbook, it has a more porous surface and I thought it might take a transfer well.

On the first page of this journal I wanted to include a message that would express the overall theme of the journal and I wanted to create it primarily with text. Since my handwriting is awful, I created an illustration in my drawing program that would fit the page. Once I had a design I was happy with, I printed it out backwards, as a mirror image, so the transfer would read correctly when complete. Once I had my laser print out, all I would need to do is place it face down on the journal page and apply a solvent to the back of the print out to dissolve the laser ink so it would print on the journal page.

Laser Printer Transfer in an Ecosystem Sketchbook

In order for the transfer to read properly on the page, I had to print my image out backwards on my laser printer. I placed this image face-down on the journal page to make the transfer.

I used  lacquer thinner to make the transfer. It is pretty nasty stuff and should only be used outdoors or in a well ventilated area. This substance is not for everyone and if you are chemically sensitive, I would recommend that you avoid this technique.

Laser printer transer

I blotted the solvent on the backside of the laser print until I could clearly see the image below. I used a fair amount of pressure to be sure I was making good contact with the journal page. In some areas, I burnished the image while the paper was still damp for a stronger transfer. Once the solvent dries, the wet areas disappear.

Laser printer transfer in a journal

To check my progress, I carefully lifted the paper to see how the transfer was being applied. I was careful to hold the paper in place to keep it lined up with the image.

When making the transfer, I applied the solvent using a paper towel and blotted the back of the paper until I could see the image clearly through the back. I found that burnishing the image while the solvent was still damp improved the depth of color. I did this slowly and checked my work frequently by lifting the laser print to see how well the transfer was being applied.

Laser printer transfer being embellished with marker and watercolor.

I added watercolor and marker to the transfer to complete the image.

Once the transfer was complete, I added a watercolor silhouette of my hand to relate to the hand on the cover and provide a subtle transition to the interior pages. This caused the paper to buckle a bit, but I did expect this since the paper is sketch paper and not watercolor paper. You can see the cover image I created in an earlier post here. To complete the illustration, I darkened the color of the large letters to add color and contrast to the image.

Final touches on the laser printer transfer.

I added marker to the large letters for additonal color and contrast.

Final transfers using this method will be somewhat fuzzy and will never look as clear as the original. But this can be used to create images that look stamped or aged and adds an interesting effect to your art. It can be combined with other elements to give your designs a unique and professional look, and is worth experimenting with if you are looking for new ways to create art.

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Ecosystem's Sketchbook

Ecosystem's Artist Sketchbook was illustrated using permanent markers and pens.

The first assignment of a journaling class I have been attending was to find a journal to decorate and claim. Since I knew I would be creating an art journal, it was time to break out a bright orange Ecosystem Sketchbook that I received as a review copy from the folks at Ecosystem. I struggled with committing to a topic for this journal, but ultimately decided to create an affirmation journal, which supported my desire for more creativity in my life. Since most of the artwork I do is created by hand, I decided to use the image of a hand on the cover to be the central theme.

I chose this sketchbook for a couple of different reasons. I was enamored with the unusual texture and bright color of the cover and I have been wanting try some different mediums on the bright white sketch paper.

For this review, I am focused on using different pens and markers on the sketchbook’s cover, which has a matte finish that feels similar to the texture of an eggshell. By touch, I suspected it would be a good receptor for permanent markers.

Hand illustration

I did the original illustration on translucent paper and then transferred it to the sketchbook's cover using charcoal on the backside of the image.

I drew the illustration on translucent layout paper so I could transfer the image to the cover rather than drawing directly on the cover. This gave me more freedom to create and enabled me to throw the paper away if I didn’t like it. It also gave  me a chance to experiment with the design. Once I had an illustration I was happy with, I turned it over and rubbed charcoal on the back of the image where I could see the lines. The charcoal became the transfer medium I used to get the illustration to the cover. By placing the illustration on the cover and drawing over the lines of the original drawing, the charcoal was pressed into the cover and the image was transferred.

Ecosystem sketchbook illustration

The finished hand illustration after it was transferred to the cover.

I started by inking in the black lines over the charcoal lines. I did this to preserve the image because I was concerned that I might smear the lines as I added color. I experimented with different markers, but ultimately ended up using the Tombow Ultra Rollerball Pen because of the rich, black lines. I used a piece of paper between my hand and the cover to minimize any smearing.

Inking the lines on the hand illustration.

I used a Tombow Ultra Rollerball Pen to ink the lines because of the rich, black color. By using a slip-sheet between my hand and the cover, I was able to minimize smearing and keep my hand clean.

Next, came the fun part, adding color with pens and markers. I used several different markers and pens on the cover and had different results with each. All of the pens had permanent ink and longer drying times than you would experience when using a porous paper. Using  water-based markers on the cover resulted in beading ink, poor coverage and smearing, so I did not include these in the test results.

Prismacolor markers on the cover of an Ecosystem Artist Sketchbook

The Prismacolor markers were my favorites because of the crisp, clean lines and smooth color in large areas.

Sharpie Fine Point Markers – The lines laid down nicely, but as they dried, the lines looked thinner and less saturated than when wet. I found as I added more color with the Sharpies, the wet line would remove any color below. This made it difficult to get a smooth area of color, but this may be due to the tiny size of the nib rather than a problem with the ink.

Berol Prismacolor Permanent Markers – These were my favorite markers on the Ecosystem cover. The color went down saturated and stayed saturated once the ink dried, even when using the fine nib. The lines created by the fine nib were crisp and clean . The larger nib laid down saturated color and I was able to create smooth areas of color. I used this marker for the colored areas on the illustration.

Pilot Precise Grip – This pen created lines that were crisp and clean and I used it to go over the black lines I originally drew with the Sharpie. They still weren’t as black as I would have preferred, so I decided to go over them with my Tombow Ultra pen.

Tombow Ultra Rollerball Pen – Once the illustration had been outlined and the color filled in, I went over all f the black lines again with the Tombow Ultra Rollerball Pen to clean things up. The ink is permanent, although it is not a marker like the others. The Tombow produced very saturated lines that were a bit thicker than the fine point markers, and I loved how black the ink was. The ink did take longer to dry than the markers, so if you use this pen, you will need to give it lots of time to dry or you will end up with smears.

Overall I was quite happy with how the permanent markers performed on the cover of the Ecosystem sketchbook. I would imagine that most permanent markers will work well and would be interested in trying Copic markers in the future.

Ecosystem Artsit Sketchbook Cover art

The final illustration. I left room for a title once the journal is complete.

I will be doing more reviews of the paper in this journal with different mediums in the future, so stay tuned. For more detailed information on Ecosystems sketchbooks and their complete line of environmentally friendly journals, please visit their site at: ecosystemlife.com.

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